Hotel SEO: Five steps to optimizing hotel deals and listings

Hotel SEO: Five steps to optimizing hotel deals and listings

Effective SEO is important to the visibility of any hotel online. To improve the traffic to your hotel website, leading to more revenue for your business, every hotel must ensure that they are properly set up to be visible on search engine results pages (SERPs). SEO allows your hotel to improve in search engine rankings and display your website higher up in the SERPs. According to statistics from Chitika: β€œSites listed on the first Google search results page generate 92% of all traffic from an average search. When moving from page one to two, the traffic dropped by 95%, and by 78% and 58% for the subsequent pages.” Apparently, if your hotel does not appear on the first page of a search engine, the likelihood of your hotel being found is less than 6%. The benefits of SEO for hotels The benefits of optimizing your hotel for search include: Keeping your hotel ahead of the competition Establishing your hotel credibility Improving hotel customer loyalty Increasing hotel brand awareness Increasing hotel profitability And of course, increasing traffic to your hotel website. Crucial strategies for optimizing hotel deals and listings for SERPs Below are some important steps to optimize your hotel deals and listing for search: #1. Buy Hotel Price Ads Hotel Price Ads, or HPAs, help to display your hotel prices and location across desktops, PCs, tablets, and mobile devices on Google and Google Maps. When you buy HPAs, travelers are able to see your hotel offers as well as directions to your hotel when they are actively searching for a hotel to book. Below are some of the major...
Google brings emoji back to the SERPs πŸ˜πŸ™ŒπŸ’―

Google brings emoji back to the SERPs πŸ˜πŸ™ŒπŸ’―

Google has revealed that emoji will once again show up in search results snippets, reversing a decision taken in 2015 to remove the characters from its results. Further context was added with the announcement that emoji will appear β€œwhere relevant, useful and fun,” and we can expect to see more of them in future. This will apply to both desktop and mobile results. A search for something as on the nose as [emoji] reveals how we can expect some results to look: Why has Google made this decision now, how prevalent will emoji become in search results, and should marketers already be trialling this latest development? Google and emoji: A brief history Emoji are pretty much everywhere nowadays, and their uptake as a form of communication is not surprising. Our brains process visual information 60,000 times faster than text, plus they come with the intrinsic benefit of circumventing language barriers. Moreover, they’re pretty fun. Advertisers, of course, have sniffed an opportunity to connect with a younger audience β€˜in their own language’, with some mixed results along the way. This is still a ubiquitous feature of online (particularly mobile) communication, with brands and celebrities routinely distilling their message into a couple of cute images on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Google, however, had adopted a different stance. After seeing that some brands were over-indulging in the emoji trend in an attempt to attract more clicks, Google removed the characters from its results altogether in 2015. The offending parties were placing the characters throughout their title tags and meta descriptions, in anticipation that this would arrest more attention than a text-only result....

Brand TLDs vs .com (part two): How can brands benefit from a .brand domain?

In part one a few weeks ago, we discussed what brand TLDs (top level domains) are, which brands have applied for them, and why they might be important. Today, we’ll take an in-depth look at the potential benefits for brands, and explore the challenges brand TLDs could help solve. Content produced in association with Neustar. Recap: what brands are doing Tech powerhouse Google has brought together content from more than 19 existing blogs under one roof at www.blog.google, and this site is now Google’s corporate blog. It has also rolled out www.environment.google, which hosts information about the company’s environmental and sustainability work, as well as its future goals. Financial services brands have followed suit, with the homepage of UK bank Barclays, for example, now found at www.home.barclays instead of the historically used barclays.com URL. Statistically, more than half of all brand TLDs fall into either financial or technology verticals. Other recognizable brands including Canon have also made the transition. Perhaps seeking to further separate its global and regional brand propositions, Canon has shifted its global homepage canon.com/global to global.canon. Brand TLDs are generally popular among large multinational companies – more than 40% of brand TLDs have been applied for by Fortune 500 companies, including BMW, which now displays its vision for the next 100 years at www.next100.bmw. Other companies using TLDs include Dell, Deloitte, Nike, NFL, Chanel, Microsoft, Audi and many more. .brand: the benefits When generic TLDs (gTLDs) like .guru, and .ninja were authorised by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Name and Numbers (ICANN), there was much debate over the potential SEO benefits. One notable and much-publicized example...
Six stats on the importance of trust in influencer marketing

Six stats on the importance of trust in influencer marketing

Image by Walter Lim, available via CC BY 2.0 Successful influencer marketing depends on trust. Influencers need to establish trust with their audiences in order for their posts to resonate. Brands and agencies conducting campaigns must establish trust with their influencers if they want their campaigns executed effectively. Consumers are inundated with media competing for their attention, and consumers’ trust for brands is lower than it’s ever been. This makes establishing trust with your audience harder and more important than ever. Generally, people trust their peers and the recommendations that they provide. So to cope with this battle for trust, savvy marketers are turning to influencer marketing to take advantage of these peer recommendations and build trust with their audiences. Don’t just take my word for it β€” look at the statistics. β€œOnly 22% of brands are trusted.” (Havas Media) That’s a frightening metric for any marketer. Without establishing trust between your brand and your audience, it’s nearly impossible to market your product or service. So marketers are faced with the difficult question of how to create and maintain trust with their audience. β€œ61% of women said they won’t engage with an influencer’s sponsored content if it doesn’t feel genuine.” (Bloglovin) Trust and authenticity are critical for engagement in any influencer campaign. Without trust, the content that you’re hoping will build engagement won’t feel genuine and won’t resonate with your desired audience. Low trust equals low engagement, and a pattern of this can erode an influencer’s audience over time. While this report references women specifically, these principles are applicable across the influencer marketing sphere. β€œ43% of millennials rank authenticity...
How marketers can dive into growth marketing

How marketers can dive into growth marketing

Growth marketing enables marketers to explore how sales and customer success can still be part of their marketing strategy. Here’s how a business can benefit from the latest tactics in growth marketing. Growth marketing refers to an effective combination of marketing, sales and customer success and is an integrated approach to modern content marketing. It has the potential to increase the effectiveness of a marketing strategy with the use of the most relevant tactics for each case. Hubspot recently hosted a webinar on how content marketers can use growth marketing, with Sujan Patel, co-founder of Mailshake & Web Profits, sharing his insights on the latest trends in content marketing. Creating a growth marketing mindset Growth marketing can help marketers solve the problems that arise from the emergence of new platforms. It is challenging to pick the right channels for your marketing strategy, especially when cross-channel marketing requires the right strategy to maintain a consistent message across all platforms. Moreover, as competition increases, it becomes clear that you can’t win in just one channel, but you need to explore a multifaceted approach. A growth marketing mindset is all about: Getting the new approach instilled into the organisation Every department has different goals, but they can all contribute to a modern marketing strategy. Once marketers understand the problems of each department and how they are all connected, it’s time to explore how marketing can help tackle these problems. Having an understanding of your marketing funnel It’s critical to be aware of how people come through your funnel. What are the strengths and the weaknesses of your current marketing funnel? How can...
Five most interesting search marketing news stories of the week

Five most interesting search marketing news stories of the week

Welcome to our weekly round-up of all the latest news and research from the world of search marketing and beyond. This week, Pinterest’s acquisition of Google’s former image search lead, Randy Keller, as Head of Search shows how serious the social network is about visual search; and Twitter’s Q4 earnings have raised questions about the company’s long-term prospects. Plus, a new study shows voice search on the rise, and Google tests a way for users to report offensive autocomplete suggestions. Google’s Randy Keller joins Pinterest as Head of Search We’ve known for a while now that visual search was becoming a key part of Pinterest’s offering as a social platform, and the past couple of weeks have seen Pinterest make even more moves to cement its position at the forefront of visual search. On February 7, Pinterest released a new set of visual discovery tools, including the long-awaited Lens, a visual recognition and search tool which lets users search the real world using the camera in their Pinterest app. Then came the announcement that Google’s former Head of Image Search, Randy Keller, has jumped ship to join Pinterest as Head of Search – a brand-new role which has just been created at the company. If anyone was in any doubt before about Pinterest’s plans to make search a central focus, they won’t be now. So what’s next for Pinterest and visual search, and more importantly, how can it use its visual expertise to drive revenue and keep users engaging with its platform in the long term? Clark Boyd took an in-depth look this week at whether Pinterest can crack...