The 6 Values (and 4 Benefits) of Agile Marketing – Whiteboard Friday

The 6 Values (and 4 Benefits) of Agile Marketing – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by AgileJim You’ve probably heard of agile processes in regards to software development. But did you know those same key values can have a huge impact if applied to marketing, as well? Being adaptive, collaborative, and iterative are necessary skills when we live in a world where Google can pull the rug out from under us at a moment’s notice. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, we welcome guest host Jim Ewel, founder of AgileMarketing.net, as he describes what’s important in the agile marketing process and why incorporating it into your own work is beneficial. Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab! Video Transcription Hey, Moz fans, this is Jim Ewel. I’m the blogger behind AgileMarketing.net, the leading blog on agile marketing, and I’m here to talk to you today about agile marketing. Agile marketing is an approach to marketing that takes its inspiration from agile software development. Like agile software development, it has a set of values and it has a set of benefits, and we’re going to talk about those values and benefits today. 6 Values of Agile Marketing Value number one: Responding to change over following a plan. It’s not that we don’t plan. It’s just that we don’t write 30- to 40-page marketing plans. Instead, every quarter, we write a one-page plan that specifies our goals, our aspirations to get everybody on the same page, and then every two to four weeks, we reset our priorities. We say, “This is what we’re going to get done during this two- to four-week period.” Value number two: Rapid iterations over...

Your Daily SEO Fix: Keywords, Concepts, Page Optimization, and Happy NAPs

Posted by FeliciaCrawford Howdy, readers! We’re back with our last round of videos for this go of the Daily SEO Fix series. To recap, here are the other topics we’ve covered previously: Your Daily SEO Fix: The Keyword Research Edition Your Daily SEO Fix: Link Building & Ranking Zero Today we’ll be delving into more keyword and concept research, quick wins for on-page optimization, and a neat way to stay abreast of duplicates and inaccuracies in your local listings. We use Moz Pro, the MozBar, and Moz Local in this week’s fixes. Fix #1: Grouping and analyzing keywords by label to judge how well you’re targeting a concept The idea of “concepts over keywords” has been around for a little while now, but tracking rankings for a concept isn’t quite as straightforward as it is for keywords. In this fix, Kristina shows you how to label groups of keywords to track and sort their rankings in Moz Pro so you can easily see how you’re ranking for grouped terms, chopping and analyzing the data as you see fit. Fix #2: Adding alternate NAP details to uncover and clean up duplicate or inaccurate listings If you work in local SEO, you know how important it is for listings to have an accurate NAP (name, address, phone number). When those details change for a business, it can wreak absolute havoc and confuse potential searchers. Jordan walks you through adding alternate NAP details in Moz Local to make sure you uncover and clean up old and/or duplicate listings, making closure requests a breeze. (This Whiteboard Friday is an excellent explanation of why...
How to Do a Content Audit [Updated for 2017]

How to Do a Content Audit [Updated for 2017]

Posted by Everett This guide provides instructions on how to do a content audit using examples and screenshots from Screaming Frog, URL Profiler, Google Analytics (GA), and Excel, as those seem to be the most widely used and versatile tools for performing content audits. {Expand for more background} It’s been almost three years since the original “How to do a Content Audit – Step-by-Step” tutorial was published here on Moz, and it’s due for a refresh. This version includes updates covering JavaScript rendering, crawling dynamic mobile sites, and more. It also provides less detail than the first in terms of prescribing every step in the process. This is because our internal processes change often, as do the tools. I’ve also seen many other processes out there that I would consider good approaches. Rather than forcing a specific process and publishing something that may be obsolete in six months, this tutorial aims to allow for a variety of processes and tools by focusing more on the basic concepts and less on the specifics of each step. We have a DeepCrawl account at Inflow, and a specific process for that tool, as well as several others. Tapping directly into various APIs may be preferable to using a middleware product like URL Profiler if one has development resources. There are also custom in-house tools out there, some of which incorporate historic log file data and can efficiently crawl websites like the New York Times and eBay. Whether you use GA or Adobe Sitecatalyst, Excel, or a SQL database, the underlying process of conducting a content audit shouldn’t change much. TABLE OF CONTENTS...
The Step-By-Step Guide to Testing Voice Search Via PPC

The Step-By-Step Guide to Testing Voice Search Via PPC

Posted by purna_v I was conned into my love of cooking by my husband. Never having set foot in the kitchen until the grand old age of 22, my husband (then boyfriend) — a former chef — said he’d teach me some simple recipes. I somewhat enjoyed the process but very much enjoyed the lavish praise he’d bestow upon me when eating whatever I whipped up. Highly encouraged that I seemingly had an innate culinary genius, I looked to grow my repertoire of recipes. As a novice, I found recipe books inspiring but confusing. For example, a recipe that called for cooked chicken made me wonder how on Earth I was meant to cook the chicken to get cooked chicken. Luckily, I discovered the life-changing power of fully illustrated, step-by-step recipes. Empowered by the clear direction they provided, I conquered cuisine after cuisine and have since turned into a confident cook. It took me only a few months to realize all that praise was simply a ruse to have me do most of the cooking. But by then I was hooked. When it comes to voice search, I’ve talked and written a lot about the subject over the past year. Each time, the question I get asked is “What’s the best way to start?” Today I’ll share with you an easy-to-follow, step-by-step guide to empower you to create your own voice search test. It’s sure to become one of your favorite recipes in coming months as conversational interfaces continue their rapid adoption rate. Testing voice search? But it’s not monetized. That’s correct. It’s not monetized as of yet. However,...
Helpful Tips for Doing Search in a Low-Volume Niche

Helpful Tips for Doing Search in a Low-Volume Niche

Posted by Jeremy_Gottlieb SEO — you know, that thing you do whereby everyone and their mother will find your site on the web. Easy, right? “Can you SEO this page for me?” or “We’re about to launch a webinar. Can you SEO-ify it, please?” I’m sure most of you reading this can probably relate to these types of questions and the ensuing pressure from bosses or clients. If you’re lucky, you work in a realm where there’s plenty of search volume to chase, featured snippets to occupy, and answer boxes to solve. But what about those who work in the low-search volume niches typically seen in B2B, or with companies pioneering a new product or service that no one really knows about yet (so they obviously can’t be searching for it)? This blog post is for you, the digital marketer who toils and struggles to drive search visibility where there hardly is any. Let’s get to work. Search, as I’ll refer to it here, includes both paid and organic. Neither of these may ultimately be the best channel for your organization, but after reading this post, hopefully you’ll be able to verify whether your search channels are humming along and working harmoniously, while leaving other sources of user acquisition to bear the brunt of the load. Three topics I will cover in this post are SEO, paid search, and CRO, but please keep in mind: these are not the only possible digital marketing actions that can be done for an organization in a low-search volume niche. This is just a glimpse into what may be possible, and hopefully it...
Ranking Multiple Domains to Own More SERP Real Estate – Whiteboard Friday

Ranking Multiple Domains to Own More SERP Real Estate – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish Is it better to rank higher in a single position frequently, or to own more of the SERP real estate consistently? The answer may vary. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand presents four questions you should ask to determine whether this strategy could work for you, shares some high-profile success cases, and explores the best ways to go about ranking more than one site at a time. Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab! Video Transcription Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re going to chat about ranking multiple domains so you can own a bunch of the SERP real estate and whether you should do that, how you should do that, and some ways to do that. I’ll show you an example, because I think that will help kick us off. So you are almost certainly familiar, if you’ve played around in the world of real estate SERPs, with Zillow and Trulia. Zillow started up here in Seattle. They bought Trulia a couple of years ago and have been doing pretty amazingly well. In fact, I was speaking at a real estate conference in New York recently, and my God, I did an example where I was searching for tons of cities plus homes for sale or plus real estate or houses, and Zillow and Trulia, along with a couple others, are in the top five for every single city I checked no matter how big or small. So very, very impressive SEO. One of the things that a lot of...